The Biggest Misconceptions About Chinese American Food

Left to right: Eric Sze and Lucas Sin (Photo: ILLUSTRATION: YENWEI LIU/HUFFPOST; PHOTOS: ALEX LAU)
Left to right: Eric Sze and Lucas Sin (Photo: ILLUSTRATION: YENWEI LIU/HUFFPOST; PHOTOS: ALEX LAU)

Chinese chefs Eric Sze and Lucas Sin both immigrated to the U.S. in 2011 for college — Sin studied cognitive science at Yale and Sze studied hospitality at NYU. Both were born in 1993. Neither has professional culinary training. Lucas was born and raised in Hong Kong, and Eric was born and raised in Taiwan. In 2015, Sin founded Junzi Kitchen and in 2018, Sze, along with partner Andy Chuang, opened Manhattan-based Taiwanese eatery 886, named after Taiwan’s international calling code. Before the pandemic, the friends hosted pop-up dinners as the Shy* Boyz Club.

Last month, Sin and Sze (and Moonlynn Tsai of Kopitiam) joined forces for a video project called “Always Keep Evolving,” which highlights their experiences with COVID-19 and xenophobia. Since the pandemic began in China, more Asian Americans have experienced racism-fueled

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