Chefs

Chefs and cooks in the disability community share recipes for accessibility | Social Issues

Chef Regina Mitchell’s Zoom cooking class begins like a lot of Zooms: friendly banter, reminders to mute here, some technical adjustments there. A few minutes after the 4:30 p.m. start time, there are about 20 people on the call. The menu for tonight: a vegetable stir-fry and a lemongrass-ginger soda.

“The blind can cook!” she says to the camera and laughs. “People say when you have lemons, you make lemonade. I turn lemons into limoncello. Or a lemon pavlova.”

Mitchell, 60, became blind as an adult. She teaches cooking through the Nevada-based organization Blindconnect and its life skills-based program, Angela’s House. On the first and second Wednesdays of the month from her kitchen in the Las Vegas Valley, Mitchell emphasizes fun and skill-sharing to help visually impaired people feel comfortable in the kitchen.

Food and cooking are essential areas where those with disabilities can often be invisible or overlooked. But

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Watch Asheville chefs dance, raise money for Food Connection

ASHEVILLE- Food Connection executive director Flori Pate said food should be fun, no matter what. The nonprofit’s newest fundraiser, Chef Dance Off for Food Connection, is nothing if not fun.

“Food distribution should not be solemn or sad; it should be a celebration of all the good food in our community,” Pate said. 

Food Connection’s mission is one that solves two problems at once: in normal times, the nonprofit rescues perfectly fresh leftover food from events and restaurant service periods and delivers it to people who need it. That helps assuage hunger and also keeps food out of the landfill.

During COVID, the majority of what Food Connection served to its clients came from restaurant partners instead. At local eateries like Pack’s Tavern and Wicked Weed, chefs cooked meals to order with the help of grants and the private donations Food Connection received.

More:Asheville restaurant feeds thousands of WNC

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Chefs and cooks in the disability community share recipes

Chef Regina Mitchell’s Zoom cooking class begins like a lot of Zooms: friendly banter, reminders to mute here, some technical adjustments there. A few minutes after the 4:30 p.m. start time, there are about 20 people on the call. The menu for tonight: a vegetable stir-fry and a lemongrass-ginger soda.

“The blind can cook!” she says to the camera and laughs. “People say when you have lemons, you make lemonade. I turn lemons into limoncello. Or a lemon pavlova.”

Mitchell, 60, became blind as an adult. She teaches cooking through the Nevada-based organization Blindconnect and its life skills-based program, Angela’s House. On the first and second Wednesdays of the month from her kitchen in the Las Vegas Valley, Mitchell emphasizes fun and skill-sharing to help visually impaired people feel comfortable in the kitchen.

Food and cooking are essential areas where those with disabilities can often be invisible or overlooked. But

Read More

Martha Stewart and other TV chefs share their best-ever cooking tips

Martha Stewart and other TV chefs share their best-ever cooking tips


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